• Welcome to O.B. Montessori

    Educating Young Citizens For A Better Philippines
  • O.B. Montessori Center envisions the emergence of a “new man” who will no longer be the victim of events but, thanks to his clarity of vision, will become able to direct and mold the future of mankind

    Our school adheres faithfully to the educational method discovered and propagated through experience by the great Dr. Maria Montessori where MAN becomes the center of education, whose mental growth and development begins at birth. Guided by his “inner teacher,” he can construct himself into a citizen of the world, able to exercise freedom and self-discipline, undistorted by fear.

      To help the child help himself – “SEIPSUM FACIT PERSONA” – Man Makes Himself – OBMC’s mission is to transform all students into self-developing individuals by establishing the right relationship between the child and the adult and by providing him with a suitable environment for learning and the skills necessary for him to become independent and productive member of the society.
      •    

        Dr. Maria Montessori
        A Woman Called Freedom

         

        On the 31st of August 1870 in Chiaravalle, located in the province of Ancona, Italy, a child by the name of Maria Montessori was born. Her father Alessandro Montessori was descended from a noble family in Bologna while her mother Renilde Stoppani was a niece of the illustrious and great philosopher-scientist-priest Antonio Stoppani.

        As a child, Maria possessed a great driving ambition, noted in her powerful character, strong sense of duty and assertive nature inciting mixed emotions among her peers – she was unpopular among some while successful among others.

        Later, she shocked her friends, many who were chauvinistic male students who gibed her, by becoming the first woman ever to receive a medical degree from the University of Rome. While working at the psychiatric clinic of the university, she threw herself into the study of children with learning disabilities and started experimenting with new ways of educating such children. From there, she developed the Montessori System of Education applying to all children and put into effect for the first time at her little slum school in Rome.

        To Montessori, while the ordinary school room had the students “nailed to their seats,” her class had one fundamental base: “The liberty of the pupils in their spontaneous manifestations.” She believes that the teacher’s primary task was to release the child’s natural individuality, to arouse their interest with special games and desires, and to let them teach themselves. The classroom has to be specially furnished with “little low windows, little tables, little armchairs, and low cupboards within reach.

        In such an atmosphere, Montessori argued that children would want to learn and gradually train their own senses by building blocks, buttoning buttons, and tracing letters from cardboard alphabets. Once they have mastered these, they would begin to grasp abstractions – reading by the time they are four, algebra at five, and cube roots at six.

        Over the years, Montessori carried her crusade far beyond her native land. With the long black dresses she often wore, she stumped the nations of Europe by working and lecturing from eight in the morning until eight in the evening. However, during the 1930’s her crusade began to slow. In Italy, Benito Mussolini closed her schools because of her anti-fascist teachings. In the United States, educators became more and more absorbed with the equally radical ideas of Columbia’s John Dewey. In addition, even some of her utmost followers betrayed her, transforming her doctrine of guided freedom into a doctrine of uncontrolled anarchy. As a result, many educators turned away in disgust.

        In her later years, although she was old and exiled, Montessori continued to preach her theory. She wandered in Barcelona where she had to be rescued during the Spanish Civil War. In India, she was interned as an enemy alien. But finally settling in the Netherlands, she set up a new training center, and wherever she went, her message was always the same: “You must fight for the rights of the child.” This inspired hundreds of educators to take up the cry.

        Until the end of her life in 1952, Montessori wanted nothing better than to spend a day with the children in her schools.

      • O.B. Montessori Timeline

      • 1959

        >Dr. Preciosa S. Soliven taught at the Cholon High School in Saigon (1959-60)

        >San Lorenzo Preschool

      • 1962

        >Kissinger Seminar USA for MVS (1962)

        >Relocation of Intramuros squatters by Arch. Oscar Arellano of Operation Brotherhood International – O.B. Sapang Palay preschool (1963). PSS managed its preschool projects.

      • 1965

         >Perugia, Italy – Italian grant for Montessori training at the Association Montessori Iternationale (1965).

      • 1968

        >First O.B. Montessori Children’s House opens in Syquia Apartments, Malate (1966)

        >Bergamo, Italy (1968-1969)

        >ABS-CBN TV Show/Max V. Soliven’s Impact TV (1970-1972)

      • 1971

         >O.B. Montessori Pre-school at Russel House, Taft

         

         >Grade school transfers to Sta. Ana

        >O.B. Montessori preschool transferred to Escoda, Paco, and N. Domingo.

        >Martial Law (1972)

      • 1974

        >OBMC Angeles Pampanga opens at St. Entierro (1975)

         

        >OBMC opens in Greenhills (1976)

      • 1977

        >U.S. State Department travel grant (Pennsylvania farm high school, New York School of Performing Arts, Lincoln Talent School) (1977)

      • 1980

        >Australia Cultural Grant (long distance education) (1981)

      • 1983-1986

      •  

         

        >1st Pagsasarili Preschool for the poor in San Martin de Porres, Cubao under National Housing Authority (1983)

        >O.B. Montessori Professional High School opens (1983)

        >Pagsasarili Mother and Child Literacy in Faraon, Negros Occidental (1984)

         

      • >OBMC Shrine – EDSA Revolution, End of Martial Law (1986)

      • 1986-1989

      •  

         

        >Elected to the UNESCO Executive Board, Paris; demonstrated the twin projects, Pagsasarili: Preschool Montessori Mothercraft Literacy Course for village mothers and to the UNESCO Secretariat (1986-1987)

        >Gus Aldeguer starts OBMC theater director (1987-2011)

        >Senate-Congress Survey of all schools (EDCOM)

        >Dr. Preciosa Soliven became a member of EDCOM Early Childhood Education (ECE) Technical Committee (1990-1995)

        >Member of the CRC Delegation to Geneva (1990)

      • 1991

        >Mt. Pinatubo Hidden Temple Shrine (1992)

         

      • 1994

        >OBMC College and La Dolce Fontana starts (1995)

        >Sara at Loyola Marymount, L.A. (1990-1993); Montessori Grade School Training in AMI, Milwaukee (1992-1993); joined the OBMC faculty (1993)

        >Given the International UNESCO Literacy Award, New Delhi, India (1993)

         

      • 1997

        >Preziosa Farm, Alfonso, Cavite starts with the help of Thai Prof. Charuphant Thongtham (1998)

        >OBMC Las Piñas opens (1998)

      • 2000

        >EFA-DAKAR Pagsasarili opens in PulungBulu Public School, Angeles, Pampanga (2001)

        >UN-Millennium Development Goal was defined (2000-2015)

        >Montessori EXPO 2000 introduces OBMC as model for Lifelong Education for Sustainable Development (2000)

      • 2003

        >20th Anniversary of OB Pagsasarili Preschool (2003)

        >OBMC pagsasarili in the World Heritage Site of Ifugao Rice Terraces, funded by the Canadian International Development Agency (2003)

        >Philippines was nominated as SEA-Center for Education for Sustainable Development (2005), and approved in 2010

        >Mayor Vilma Santos-Recto’s Pagsasarili Preschools in Batangas starts (2005)

      • 2006

         

        >40-Year OBMC Anniversary (2007)
      • 2010

        >Philippine approval as SEA-CLLSD Category 2 (2010)

        >OBMC Fairvew Branch opens (2010)

      • 2016

      • < OBMC Golden Anniversary Celebration at the PICC (2016)

        O.B. Montessori Center, the recognized pioneer of Montessori education in the Philippines, marked a milestone in its history by celebrating its 50th anniversary with the grandest spectacle yet at the PICC Plenary Hall last December 10, 2016.

                    Billed as “Young and Ready for the World”, the spectacle featured a cast of 400 talented students and staff from all its five campuses with the participation of two of its distinguished alumnae, internationally acclaimed singer Lea Salonga and pop theater diva Shiela Valderrama-Martinez.

         

      • Directed by well-known playwright and Palanca awardee for Literature Floy Quintos, “Young and Ready for the World” represented a continuance of the grand OBM tradition of the spectacle, which is much, much more than just a grand production.

                    Before entering the Plenary Hall, an exhibit of selected OBMC alumni greeted the audience. The exhibit looked back at 35 former students who are in the process of transformation, from chrysalis to full-fledged butterflies. And theirs is a journey that is continuing.

        Directed by well-known playwright and Palanca awardee for Literature Floy Quintos, “Young and Ready for the World” represented a continuance of the grand OBM tradition of the spectacle, which is much, much more than just a grand production.

                    Before entering the Plenary Hall, an exhibit of selected OBMC alumni greeted the audience. The exhibit looked back at 35 former students who are in the process of transformation, from chrysalis to full-fledged butterflies. And theirs is a journey that is continuing.